The Practice of Osteopathy
Carl Philip McConnell and Charles Clayton Teall
Third Edition
1906
   
Contents
 

PREFACE TO THIRD EDITION

PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION
 

PART I

INTRODUCTION
 
OSTEOPATHIC ETIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY
    Osteopathic lesion; Etiological factors; Osseous lesion; Muscular Lesion; Ligamentous lesion; Visceral lesion; Composite lesion; Pathology, Spinal lesions; Proof.

OSTEOPATHIC DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS
    The Spine; Examination; Vertebrae; Position in examination.  Neck, Head and face.  Atlas, Axis, Skull, Third Cervical, Muscles of the Neck, Temporo-Maxillary Articulation, Scalp, Ribs, Clavicle, Sternum, Dorso-Lumbar, Thorax, Abdomen, Gall-Bladder, Spleen, Stomach, Intestines, Kidneys, Lumber, Pelvis, Sacrum, Coccyx, Arms, Legs.

OSTEOPATHIC PROGNOSIS

OSTEOPATHIC TECHNIQUE
    Sense of touch, Definite principles, General treatment, Position, Neck, Head, Ribs, Dorsal, Lumbar, Abdomen, Pelvis, Legs, Arms, How often to treat, Length of treatment, Over treatment, Misapplied treatment.

OSTEOPATHIC CENTERS, STIMULATION, INHIBITION, READJUSTMENT, VASO-MOTOR AND SENSORY NERVES

SPINAL CURVATURE

POTT’S DISEASE

SPRAINS AND FRACTURES

POSTURAL DEFECTS
    Round shoulders, Prominent Hip, Pendulous Abdomen, Prolapsed Organs.  Affections of the lids, Diseases of the Lachrymal Apparatus, Conjunctiva, Cornea, Iris, Chorid, Inflammation of the Retina, Optic Nerve.  Atrophy of the Optic Nerve.  General Conditions.

DISEASES OF THE EAR

MENTAL DISEASES

SKIN DISEASES

ANIMAL PARASITES

HEMORRHAGES

VARICOSE VEINS

RECTUM

HEMORRHOIDS

PROSTATE GLANDS

VARIOCELE

IMPOTENCY

GONORRHEA

SYPHILIS

HEAT STROKE
 
 

PART II
 
INFECTIOUS DISEASES
    Fever
    Typhoid
    Mountain
    Typhus
    Malarial
    Septicemia
    Pyemia
    Smallpox
    Varioloid
    Vaccination
    Scarlet Fever
    Measles
    Rubella
    Chicken-Pox
    Mumps
    Whooping Cough
    Influenza
    Dengue
    Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis
    Diphtheria
    Dysentery
    Erysipelas
    Yellow Fever
    Tetanus
    Simple Continued Fever
    Tuberculosis
    Lobar Pneumonia

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES
    Rheumatic Fever
    Rheumatism, Subacute
    Rheumatism, Chronic Articular
    Rheumatism, Muscular
    Arthrutis Deformans
    Gout
    Lithemia
    Diabetes Mellitis
    Diabetes Insipidus
    Rickets
    Obesity
    Scurvy
    Scurvy, Infantile
    Purpura
    Hemophelia

DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
    Diseases of the Mouth
        Stomatitis
        Stomatitis, Catarrhal
        Stomatitis, Apthous
        Stomatitis, Ulcerative
        Stomatitis, Parasitic
        Stomatitis, Gangrenous
    Diseases of the Tongue
        Glossitis
    Diseases of the Salivary Glands
        Ptyalism
        Aptyalism
        Parotitis, Symptomatic
        Parotitis, Chronic
    Diseases of the Tonsils
        Tonsillitis, Acute
        Tonsils, Chronic Enlarged
        Pharyngitis, Acute Catarrhal
        Pharyngitis, Chronic Catarrhal
    Diseases of the Esophagus
        Esophagitis, Acute
        Esophagus, Spasm of
        Esophageal Obstruction
    Diseases of the Stomach
        Gastritis, Acute Catarrhal
        Gastritis, Chronic Catarrhal
        Gastralgia
        Gastric Ulcer
        Gastric Cancer
        Dilatation of the Stomach
    Diseases of the Intestines
        Acute Diarrhea
        Chronic Diarrhea
        Acute Dyspeptic Diarrhea
        Enteroptosis
        Cholera Infantum
        Acute Entro-Colitis
        Cholera Morbus
        Intestinal Colic
        Hernia
        Appendicitis

DISEASES OF THE LIVER AND BILE DUCTS
    Hyperemia of the Liver
    Catarrhal Jaundice
    Jaundice
    Abscess of the Liver
    Hepatic Cancer
    Cirrhosis of the Liver
    Amyloid Liver
    Gall-Stones
    Diseases of the Spleen
        Splenitis
    Diseases of the Peritoneum
        Acute Peritonitis
        Chronic Peritonitis
        Ascites
    Diseases of the Pancreas
    Pancreatitis

DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
    Diseases of the Nose
        Acute Nasal Catarrh
        Chronic Nasal Catarrh
        Hay Fever
    Diseases of the Larynx
        Acute Catarrhal Laryngitis
        Chronic Catarrhal Laryngitis
        Laryngitis Stridulus
        Spasmodic Laryngitis
        Tuberculous Laryngitis
        Syphilitic Laryngitis
        Edematous Laryngitis
    Diseases of the Bronchi
        Acute Bronchitis
        Chronic Bronchitis
        Fibrinous Bronchitis
        Bronchiectasis
        Bronchial Asthma
    Diseases of the Lungs
        Emphysema
        Acute Lobar Pneumonia
        Broncho-pneumonia
        Chronic Interstitial Pneumonia
        Congestion of the Lungs
        Edema of the Lungs
    Diseases of the Pleura
        Pleurisy
        Hydrothorax
        Pneumothorax

DISEASES OF THE URINARY SYSTEM
    Renal hyperemia
    Acute Parenchymatous Nephritis
    Chronic Parenchymatous Nephritis
    Interstitial Nephritis
    Amyloid Kidney
    Pyelitis
    Uremia
    Renal Calculus
    Movable Kidney

DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
    Diseases of the Pericardium
        Pericarditis
        Endocarditis
    Diseases of the Heart
        Valvular Diseases
        Hypertrophy
        Dilitation
        Degeneration of the Muscle
        Neurosis of
    Diseases of the Arteries
        Arterio-Sclerosis
        Aneurism

DISEASES OF THE BLOOD AND DUCTLESS GLANDS
    Anemia
    Addison’s Disease
    Diseases of the Thyroid Gland
        Goitre
        Exophthalmic Goitre
        Myxedema

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    Diseases of the Nerves
        Neuritis
        Sciatica
        Neuralgia
    Diseases of the Cranial Nerves
    Diseases of the Spinal Nerves
    Diseases of the Spinal Cord
        Spinal Hyperemia
        Spinal Anemia
        Spinal Hemorrhage
        Acute Myelitis
        Anterior Poliomyelitis
        Acute Ascending Paralysis
        Locomotor Ataxia
        Hereditary Ataxia
        Spastic Paraplegia
        Ataxic Paraplegia
        Syringomyelia
        Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
        Progressive Muscular Atrophy
        Bulbar Paralysis

DISEASES OF THE BRAIN
    Tumors of the Spinal Cord and Brain
    Pachymeningitis
    Leptomeningitis
    Congestion of the Brain
    Anemia of the Brain
    Edema of the Brain
    Cerebral Hemorrhage
    Embolism and Thrombosis of the Cerebral Vessels
    Aphasia
    Inflammation of the Brain
    Hydrocephalus
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Cerebral Palsies of Children
    General Paresis

GENERAL AND FUNCTIONAL DISEASES
    Paralysis Agitans
    Acute Chorea
    Huntington’s Chorea
    Choreiform Affections
    Infantile Convulsions
    Epilepsy
    Migraine
    Occupation Neurosis
    Hysteria
    Vaso-motor and Trophic Disorders
    Ranaud’s Disease

DISEASES OF THE MUSCLES
    Thompton’s Disease
    Pseudo-muscular Hypertrophy

THE HIP-JOINT
    Dislocations
    Hip-joint Disease

FRACTURE OF THE NECK OF THE FEMUR

HIP-DEFORMITIES IN INFANTILE PARALYSIS AND OTHER SPINAL DISEASES
 



 
PREFACE TO THIRD EDITION.
 
            The first and second editions of this volume have been exhausted for some time and in view of continued demands from many sources I have, in collaboration with Doctor Trall, brought out the third edition.

            The subject matter has been entirely revised and rewritten with copious additions of new and original matter.  Many of the older practitioners have contributed ideas of interest from their observations, for which credit has been duly given.  The literature of osteopathy has been diligently searched for material to bring the contents up to the point of present development.  A special chapter has been contributed by Dr. Geo. M. Laughlin, Professor of Clinical Osteopathy and Osteopathic Technique, American School of Osteopathy, on Hip-Joint Diseases, a subject on which he has put much thought and study.

            There are certain facts concerning disease, i.e., prodromes, course and termination, both with and without treatment, which are the result of centuries of observation, and these diseases, when they come within the realm of a definite diagnosis, have a well defined history.  Pneumonia is pneumonia to the osteopath the same as it is to the allopath, homeopath and eclectic, no matter how soon or how much our treatment may later change its course.  In writing on these diseases it has been necessary to use these facts, taken from medical sources, but care has been used to give them from a viewpoint based upon extended osteopathic experience.  It is necessary to follow the medical classification until such time as osteopathic records shall show sufficient data on which to base a new nosology, a new symptomatology and a new terminology.  That this will be the logical outcome of such tabulation, the close observer will doubtless admit.  Disease is not so dependent upon the character of the irritation as it is:  First, on the degree of the irritation; second, on the function of the nerve disturbed; third, on the character of the tissue involved.  Future osteopathic etiology will take these points into consideration in the development and establishment of a new classification of disease.  It is well known to the osteopath that in many acute conditions, symptoms are present which would lead him to expect, in course of time, the development of some well defined disease, yet under treatment they are found to be vaso-motor or other disturbances, and, on correction of the irritation, quickly subside.  These conditions have not progressed to a point where they could be diagnosed although they would often develop into a disease entity.  Experiences of this kind have lead the osteopath to often give to these derangements the name of the lesion causing them and there can be no doubt as to the lucidity of such a proceeding.  It has, in a way, made a start for the new order of things.

            In taking from this sum of medical knowledge the authors offer no apology from the fact that nothing has yet been developed to take the place of the material of which use has been made.  In the preparation of this edition the authors have had access to several osteopathic text-books, which was impossible before, as this was the first osteopathic text-book published.  Frequent reference has been made to the writing of Dr. Still, Hulett’s Principles of Osteopathy, Clark’s Applied Anatomy, Hazzard’s Practice of Osteopathy, Tasker’s Principles of Osteopathy and Young’s Surgery.  Special attention has been given osteopathic diagnosis and treament, emphasizing the need of the former and going into detail of technique in the latter.  With but few exceptions, no conditions are described of which there is not more or less knowledge from osteopathic experience.  There has been an effort to make conservation and confidence preeminent features of the entire work.

            The authors wish to here acknowledge the valuable assistance rendered by Dr. Minnie E. Osesnbaugh in correcting manuscript and reading proof.

            CARL PHILIP McCONNELL

            Chicago, October, 1906

 



 
PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION.
 
            This work on the practice of osteopathy has been written purely for the practitioner and student of osteopathy.  Up to the present time there has been little attempt made along osteopathic lines in a literary way.  The student has had nothing whatever to guide him in his studies but the notes he has taken from osteopathic lectures; and the practitioner no work to guide him or to refer to in his practice; yet it is with many misgivings, on account of the science of osteopathy being in crude published form, that I publish this work and give it to the osteopathic world.  Still I feel a feeble attempt will be  a stimulus to all apostles of the science, and especially so as the art of osteopathic practice is being well advanced.  It will never be possible to write osteopathy completely and in detail as each case is an individual study.  The best we can expect is to give the philosophy of the science and to state the principles in general terms.  The science is practically unlimited; its breadth and depth are unmeasurable.

            Osteopathic practice consists, first, of understanding the normal so that the abnormal conditions may be recognized when met; and second, when these abnormalities are found, of giving specific treatment and readjusting the parts.  Practically, to the osteopath it makes but little difference what the disease is; it is his business to locate the derangement and correct it.  This practical work is included in the practice of osteopathy and it constitutes the major part of the work; although I have given hydrotherapeutics, nursing, etc., not because I do not think readjustment of the tissues is sufficient to cure many diseases, but occasionally diseases are due to errors in diet, insanitary surroundings, disobedience of hygienic rules, etc.; and besides the proper use of water, food, etc., is an important aid oftentimes in alleviating suffering, being at the same time not injurious to the patient as drugs often are; especially in diseases that are far advanced the use of hydrotherapeutics, etc., is of aid.

            I have given the old classification of diseases on account of its being universally employed and an attempt at a scientific classification might cause the loss of many points, as our students are taught according to the old classification.  I hope to see an attempt made in the near future to establish a more scientific nosology.  It seems to me that the classification should be based upon the cause of the disturbance or according to the physiological disturbance.  The diseases are taken up and classified in a manner according to the best of our practices of medicine, as, definition, etiology, morbid anatomy, symptoms, etc.  This is given in such a manner, not because there is anything special to add in morbid anatomy or symptoms, but that it makes the work a complete practice of osteopathy and is inclusive of lectures given at the American School of Osteopathy.  In a few instances I have given a theoretical treatment in diseases in which osteopathy has not had experience.

            I am specially indebted to Osler, Anders, Tyson, Loomis, Raue, Goss, Stephens, and Hughes’ practices of medicine and to the writers in Allbutt’s System of Medicine and the American Text-Book on the Practice of Medicine.  Also to American Text-Books, Landois and Sterling’s, Schaeffer’s, Foster’s, Flint’s and Yeo’s Physiologies and to Ziegler’s, Greene’s and Stengel’s Pathologies for many valuable ides.  It has been my full intention to give credit when possible, but not having access to first papers it has frequently been impossible to do so.

            From my wife, Dr. Agnes Russell Darling, I have received much valuable aid in the preparation of the book.

            To all my colleagues in the American School of Osteopathy and the Staff of the A. T. Still Infirmary, I am greatly indebted for many valuable suggestions.

            I am under special obligations to Mr. Samuel D. Barnes, a senior student in the college, who has been a most able and untiring assistant in the correcting of the manuscript.

            CARL PHILIP McCONNELL.

            Kirksville, Mo. 1890.