Endo-Nasal, Aural and Allied Techniques
Thomas T. Lake, N.D., D.C.
1949 (Sixth Edition)
  
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
DEDICATION

PREFACES

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I
History, Philosophy and Principles of EndoNasal, Aural and Allied Techniques

CHAPTER II
Oxygen a Necessity
Oxygen Requirements
Oxygen Transport in Open Cavities
Obstructions to Transport
Oxygen Transport and Oxidation in the Closed Cavities

CHAPTER III
Causes of Anoxia and Anoxemia
Methods of Examination

CHAPTER IV
General Endo-Nasal, Aural and Allied Techniques

CHAPTER V
Specific Endo-Nasal, Aural and Allied Techniques

CONCLUSION


FIGURES

1. First Contact in the Lake Head Recoil Technique
2. Second Contact in the Lake Head Recoil Technique
3. Third Contact in the Lake Head Recoil Technique
4. Showing the Aproximate Positions
5. First Contact of the External Carotid Sinus
6. Second Contact of the External Carotid Sinus
7. Approach to the Pharyngeal Cavity
8. In the Pharyngeal Cavity
9. Contact for Fixation Technique Adjustments
10. Outline of Sutures
11. Opening the Right Fonto Malar Zygomatic Suture
12. Opening the Fronto Nasal Suture
13. Opening the Left Fronto Malar Zygomatic Suture
14. Opening the Right Naso-Maxillary Suture
15. Opening the Left Naso-Maxillary Suture
16. First Contact on the Malar Bone
17. Last Contact on the Malar Bone
18a. Finger Technique for Opening of Anterior Nares
18b. Angles of Adjustment for the External and Middle Ear
19. Testing with Nasal Dialator
20. Finger Tonsil Drainage Technique
21. Tonsil Suction Technique
22. Pharynx and Larynx Technique
23. First Contact for Breaking Adhesions
24. Second Contact for Breaking Adhesions
25. Breaking Adhesions of the Thymus Gland
26. First Contact for Gland Lifting Technique
27. Physician's First Contact in Diaphragmic Technique
28. Patient's First Contact in Diaphragmic Lifting Technique
29. Areas of Carbonic Gas Pressures that Cause Cranial Distress
30. No Title
31. Normal Ear Drum
32. Mouth of Eustachian Tube


 
To
W. Wallace Fritz, M.D., N.D.

who first used part of these techniques on the author years ago with such success that his hearing was largely, restored, and whose valuable instruction in neuropathy, and many acts of encouragement and kindness were always an inspiration, this book is respectfully dedicated.


 

PREFACE TO THE FIRST, SECOND, THIRD AND FOURTH EDITIONS.

 

This little book on Endo-Nasal, Aural and Allied Techniques was written for physicians who are interested in the manipulative form of treatment for conditions affecting the respiratory tract and its appendages.

It was written to enable them to acquire, with as little preliminary reading as possible, the rudimentary facts which are essential to appreciate properly what is heard and seen in the actual work of the class room. The reception of these techniques by the physicians of all schools who have sat in the classes has been of great gratification to the author.

The effort has been made to state the subject concisely and briefly without sacrificing accuracy or any of the essentials. The only techniques given here are those that have been thoroughly tested in office practice and found by the author to have been efficacious.

In all editions, we have endeavored to retain the brevity and conciseness of the previous editions. In this edition, however, we have added much new information with photographs of the moves of the techniques as far as it is possible to do so. There are some novel suggestions far from the accepted theories of body mechanics that no doubt will create debate, but thus do we move from the "sit tight" policy of bigotry to that of more knowledge.

The present volume is an effort to systematize and classify a group of techniques that would give manipulative physicians a logical method of approach to a field of unlimited therapeutic possibilities which has been long neglected by them because of the trend to specialization. The writer has met thousands of manipulative physicians in his lecture tours, and wishes to acknowledge to all of them his deep sense of gratitude not only for their aid in developing these techniques, but also for the friendly manner in which both he and the techniques were received.

 

THE AUTHOR.

 

 
PREFACE TO FIFTH AND SIXTH EDITIONS.
 
 
The acceptance of this work has been most gratifying, and the orders for additional copies compelled us to issue still another edition.
 
We have maintained the brevity and conciseness of former editions with here and there some changes to bring the material up to date.
 
We shall never cease to be grateful to the hundreds of physicians who have been so kind in aiding to make this work worth while.
 
Sincerely,

 

THE AUTHOR.