Osteopathy Complete
Elmer D. Barber, D. O.
1898
  
            
DISEASES OF THE EYE, EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT
 
 
EXPLANATORY

    In the treatment of diseases of the above named organs the osteopath is very successful, benefiting nearly all, and curing many chronic diseases that have baffled the skill of the medical fraternity.
    In nearly all diseases of the neck or head it is necessary to give a thorough General Treatment of the Neck, thereby freeing the circulation to and from the diseased parts.
    In some rare instances the atlas will be found slipped or partially dislocated, in which case returning it to its normal position will usually cure the disease.
    Diseases of the head are often aggravated by female troubles, diseases of the alimentary canal and other organs, which must be cured before we can hope to attain the desired end.
    Granulated eyelids, dripping eyes, inflammation of the eyes, catarrh, polypus of the nose, catarrhal deafness and roaring in the head, enlarged tonsils, mumps erysipelas of the face, and many other diseases of the head, are caused, by a contracted condition of the muscles of the neck, obstructing the flow of the venous blood on its return journey to the heart.  The circulation being thus interrupted, disease at the weakest point is the result.  To remove the cause by a General Treatment of the Neck is but the work of a moment, and never fails to effect a cure.
 
 
GENERAL TREATMENT OF THE NECK

    1.  Place the patient on the back; with one hand under the chin and the other under the back of the head, pull gently, rotating the head in all directions, slowly but strongly, endeavoring to stretch all muscles of the neck (see cut 8).
    2.  Pull slowly on the head until the body moves.
    3.  Place the left hand on the top of patient's head, the right hand and arm beneath the head and neck, two fingers upon each side of the fourth dorsal vertebra, the ends of the fingers pressing hard, moving the muscles upward, at the same time press rather hard with the left hand, rotating the head from side to side, the fingers of the right hand working gradually upward, until the occipital is reached (cut 46).
    4.  Standing at patient's head, place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the fingers just back of the transverse processes of the upper cervicals; give gentle extension, rotating the head to the right, with the left hand moving the muscles forward and over the transverse processes upon the left side; rotate the head in the opposite direction, with the right hand moving the muscles forward and over the transverse processes upon the right side; move the hands downward to the next lower cervicals; rotate the head as before, and repeat until the last cervical is reached (cut 47).
    5.  Manipulate the muscles thoroughly and deep, in the front of the neck; place the hand under the chin, drawing the head backward, thus giving these muscles extension; work as deeply as possible under the inferior maxillary.
 
 
The Eye
 

TRACHOMA, OR GRANULAR LIDS (GRANULATED EYELIDS)
(A form of conjunctivitis, characterized by hard pustules or granular excrescences, round and
gray, on the inner surface of the eyelids, with inflammation of the membrane.)

SYMPTOMS
    In this affection the conjunctival mucous membrane of the eye is raised into little projections, presenting a rough, irregular appearance.  It is a consequence of long-continued or maltreated inflammation and if not cured, it may in time occasion opacities of the cornea by the irritation it causes, followed by blindness.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Standing at the head of the table, with the index finger work gently, but as deeply as possible, moving the muscles and pressing under the edge of the bone entirely around the eye (cut 48); this frees the circulation and gives immediate relief.
    3.  Pinch the eyelids gently wherever granules are formed, thus starting a natural circulation.
    We have never known this method to fail, even in the worst cases.  One old gentleman at Lewistown, Missouri, was cured by us in this manner, after suffering fifty years, in two months' time.   The usual time required for an ordinary case is from four to twelve weeks.  Treatment should be given every other day.
 



 
INFECTION OF THE EYES
(A morbid state, characterized in its simplest form by heat, redness, and pain in the eyes.)

SYMPTOMS
    Often comes on with a sensation of sand in the eyes.  In some instances this complaint proceeds no farther, but at other times it is followed by heat, redness, and prickling, with darting pains.

CAUSE
    The cause is attributed by the medical profession to a stoppage of function in the microscopic elements of the involved tissues, or to changes in the blood-vessels and blood, and exudation of liquor sauguinis, with permeation of white blood corpuscles, without rupture of the vessels, into the contiguous parts; or to altered nutrition of the tissues.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  With the index finger work gently but deeply under the edge of the bones surrounding the eye, beginning deeply in the corner of the eye, and being particular to press against the bone, and not the eyeball (cut 48).  Raise the finger entirely off the flesh as it is moved forward; in this manner the eye can be treated very thoroughly and deeply without giving pain, while if the operator endeavors to slide his finger over the flesh without removing it from the eye, the operation is painful, and the results not so pronounced.
    It is always well to manipulate all the muscles in the immediate vicinity of the eye, thus freeing the circulation.
    3.  Place two fingers lightly over the eye and vibrate.  Being careful not to move the lid, which should be kept steady on the eyeball, that the vibration may pass through. See Vibration.  The vibration should be felt very deeply.
    This treatment will require about ten or fifteen minutes, and should be given each day until recovery.
    We have cured many cases of inflammation of the eyes in which the patient was in such a condition that it was necessary for him to be led to our office, in a very few days, by this method of treatment.
    Many cases, however, are more stubborn, requiring from six to eight weeks, and, in chronic cases, often three months' treatment is required to effect a cure.
    A great many cases of inflammation of the eyes, and other diseases of the head, are due to a slip or partial dislocation of the atlas, which can be readily discovered by making a careful examination, and must be reduced before a cure can be expected.  See Dislocation of the Atlas.
 



 
CATARRHAL CONJUNCTIVITIS
(Inflammation of the conjunctiva.)

SYMPTOMS
    Conjunctiva red; eyelids stuck together on awakening, and feel heavy; itching and burning sensation.

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
PHLYCTENULAR CONJUNCTIVITIS
(Inflammation of the conjunctiva, with small blisters under the epithelium, containing lymph.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
DIFFUSE PARENCHYMATOUS KERATITIS
(Inflammation of the substance of the cornea.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
ACUTE PHLYCTENULAAR KERATITIS
(Inflammation of the cornea characterized by small vesicles on its surface.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
IRITIS
(Inflammation of the iris.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
SCLERITIS
(Inflammation of the sclera.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
EPISCLERITIS
(Inflammation, with infiltration, and sero-fibrinous exudation in the outer layer of the sclerotic and
upper layer of the conjunctiva - violet in color, hard and sensitive.)

TREATMENT
    See Trachoma.
 



 
CILIARY BLEPHARITIS
(Inflammation of the edges of the eyelids which are hyperemic and swollen; skin between the cilia covered with little scales; small ulcers in hair-follicles and sebaceous glands; inflammation of the Meibomian glands.)

TREATMENT
    See Trachoma.
 



 
DACRYOCYSTITIS
(Inflammation of the lachrymal sac.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
TENONITIS
(Inflammation of Tenon's Capsule.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
 



 
PTERYGIUM
(Chronic thickening of the conjunctiva at the inner canthus, extending out over the eyeball.  A film on the eye.  Popularly called a web.)

TREATMENT
    1.  See Inflammation of the Eyes.
    2.  Grasp the eyelid between the thumb and finger, and pinch gently and deep enough to reach the pterygium, which should be treated in this manner quite thoroughly, great care being exercised not to cause the patient unnecessary pain.  This treatment starts the circulation and causes the pterygium to be taken up by absorption.
    Treatment should be given every other day.
    A cure may be expected in from four to twelve weeks.
 



 
LEUCOMA, OR ALBUGO
(Dense opacity of the cornea; white spot in the eye.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eye, placing particular stress to free the circulation thoroughly, immediately around and through the eye, by careful manipulation; also be particular to vibrate thoroughly.
 



 
PANNUS
(Vascularization and opacity of the cornea.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eye, placing, particular stress on the vibration and manipulation to free the circulation around and through the eye.
 



 
CATARACT
(An affection of the sight, in which the vision is either partially or wholly prevented, by a permeation of opaque matter in the crystalline lens of the eye.  Is of two kinds, hard and soft.  Hard is most common in old people.  Soft is most frequently found in children, especially among those who have been born with this condition, when it is called Congenital Cataract, but may occur at any age.      When it is the result of a wound of the lens, it is called Traumatic Cataract.  In children it presents a bluish-white appearance like milk and water in the pupil, and is easily recognizable; the color is much darker and less distinct in aged persons, and more difficult to see, but the opacity of the lens can be detected by careful examination.)

TREATMENT
    See Inflammation of the Eyes.
    In treating this disease the osteopath is unusually successful, curing nearly all cases that are taken in any reasonable time.
    Treatment should be given every other day, until a cure is effected, which will require from four weeks to six months.
    Cataracts have been removed by this treatment, after the patient had become almost entirely blind.
 



 
STRABISMUS, OR CROSSED EYES
(A condition in which the visual axes of the eyes are crossed, transfixing the object.)

    This affection is not successfully treated by osteopaths.
 



 
MYOPIA, MYOPY, OR NEAR-SIGHTEDNESS (ALSO SHORT-SIGHTEDNESS; PURBLINDNESS)
(Defect in vision so that objects can be clearly seen only when very close to the eye, generally produced by too much convexity of the cornea or crystalline lens, causing the focus of parallel rays to be in front of the retina instead of on the cornea.)

TREATMENT
    1.  See Inflammation of the Eye, omitting vibration.
    2.  With the eye closed, place the finger immediately over the cornea, pressing gently, gradually increasing the strength used, for one minute.
    Treatment should be given every other day.
    Many cases have been benefited by this method.
 



 
DRIPPING EYES

    Dripping eyes are usually accompanied with a catarrhal difficulty in the lachrymal duct, which conveys all watery substances from the eye to the interior of the nose.  Its obstruction causes the overflow at the eye; we must therefore cure the catarrh, and the eyes will take care of themselves.

TREATMENT
    1.  Give the General Treatment for the Neck.
    2.  Free all the muscles around the eyes as in Inflammation of the Eyes (cut 48).
    3.  Beginning deep in the corner of the eye, with the thumb on one side of the nose, the index finger on the other, move the flesh and muscles upward and downward its entire length.
    This treatment is almost infallible, cases of twenty years' standing have been cured by us in one month's time.  Treatment should be given every other day.
 



 

The Ear
 

ACUTE CATARRHAL OTITIS MEDIA, OR EARACHE
(Catarrhal inflammation of the middle ear.  Usually due to extension of catarrhal inflammation of the naso-pharynx to the tympanic cavity by
way of the Eustachian tube.)

SYMPTOMS
    Intense aching pain; membrana tympani red.

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Manipulate very thoroughly and deep all the muscles around the ear.
    3.  With the index finger work as deeply into the ear as possible without giving pain, endeavoring to move the muscles in every possible direction.
    4.  Grasp the inferior portion of the lobule between the thumb and finger, and pull gently but quite strongly, slightly downward and backward, thus stretching the muscles and freeing the circulation very deeply.
    5.  Place the fingers lightly over the Gasserian ganglion (cut 49), and vibrate gently one minute.
    6.  Patient should inhale deeply, and, while holding the nose and mouth, endeavor to force the air through the ears, thus springing the drums and starting the circulation.
    It is also advisable in stubborn cases to make a small paper tube; place one end in the patientís ear, the other in the mouth of the operator, and blow strongly a few seconds.
    In almost all diseases of the ear the osteopath is very successful, curing many cases instantly and many others in a few treatments.  The usual time required in chronic cases, however, is from one to three months.  These results are reached almost entirely through the circulation, and consequently nearly all diseases of the ear are treated by the osteopath in a similar manner.
    Occasionally, in diseases of the ear, a slight slip or dislocation of the atlas is found, in which case it is necessary to reduce the dislocation, when an immediate change for the better may be expected.      See Dislocation of the Atlas.
    Treatment in acute cases in all diseases of the ear should be given each day and will occupy about fifteen or twenty minutes.  Chronic cases will require the same length of time, and should be treated every other day.
 



 
CHRONIC CATARRHAL OTITIS MEDIA
(May follow an acute attack.)

SYMPTOMS
    Ringing in the ears; deafness; tendency to breathe through the mouth, if patient is a child.

TREATMENT
    See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media.
 



 
AURAL VERTIGO, OR MENIEREíS DISEASE
(Feeling of rotary movements, referred to the patient or to surrounding objects, with loss of
equilibrium, but conscious.)

SYMPTOMS
    Ringing in ears; pallor; nausea; clammy sweat; vomiting; jerking of eyeballs; paroxysms sometimes throwing the patient to the ground.

TREATMENT
    1. General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Place the patient upon a stool; the operator placing one knee between the scapulae about the third dorsal, raise the arms slowly but strongly above the head, pressing hard with the knee as the arms are lowered with a backward motion (cut 5).
    This disease is often occasioned by a slight slip or dislocation of the atlas.  See Dislocation of the Atlas.
 



 
DEAFNESS
(A lack or deficiency in the sense of hearing; a whole or partial inability to distinguish sound.)

CAUSE
    May be due to pressure of a tumors inflammatory exudation at the base of the brain, disease of the mastoid process of the temporal bone, or disease of the auditory nucleus or peripheral nerves.

TREATMENT
    See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media.
 



 
CATARRHAL DEAFNESS AND ROARING IN THE HEAD

TREATMENT
    Catarrhal deafness can be always benefited, and usually cured, by the Catarrhal (Coryza) Treatment, after which the patient should inhale deeply, and, while holding, the nose and mouth, endeavor to force the air through the drums of the ears, thus springing the drums and starting the circulation.
 



 
OTOMYCES, OR OTOMYCOSIS
(Fungous growth in the ear.)

TREATMENT
    See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media.
 



 
OTONCUS
(An aural tumor.)

TREATMENT
    See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media.
 



 
OTOPYOSIS
(Discharge of pus from the ear.)

TREATMENT
    See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media.
 



 
OTORRHAGIA
(Discharge of blood from the ear.)

TREATMENT
    See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media.
 



 
 
The Nose
 
 
CORYZA, ACUTE RHINITIS, ACUTE NASAL CATARRH, OR COLD IN THE HEAD
(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose and connecting sinuses.)

SYMPTOMS
    This disease sometimes prevails epidemically, and it is to this form medical writers apply the term "influenza," while cases that occur incidentally are called catarrh, or cold.  When it prevails epidemically, it undoubtedly depends upon the state of the atmosphere, though in some cases it has been attributed to contagion.
    In general, it comes on with a dull pain or sense of weight in the forehead, sometimes preceded by a slight chill, redness of the eyes, and fullness and heat in the nostrils, which is soon followed by a thin acrid fluid from the nose, together with soreness in the windpipe, hoarseness, frequent sneezing, dry cough, loss of appetite, and general lassitude.  Toward evening the pulse becomes considerably quickened and a slight fever arises.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Beginning deep in the corner of the eyes, move the muscles upward and downward, with as hard a pressure as patient can stand, the entire length of the nose.
    It is also well to manipulate thoroughly the muscles around, over, and under the eyes.
    3.  Beginning at the nose, follow the superior maxillary, manipulating very deeply its entire length.
    4.  Place the finger-tips over the Gasserian ganglion (cut 49), and vibrate one minute; also vibrate an equal length of time over the infra-orbital foramen.
    Catarrh in its various forms is often caused by a slip or partial dislocation of the atlas.  In such instances to reduce the dislocation almost invariably cures the disease.  See Dislocation of the Atlas.
    5.  Place one hand on the back of the head, the other on the forehead, and press very hard, moving the muscles of the forehead in all directions, especially those immediately over the eye.
    This treatment, in acute cases, should be given each day, and will occupy about fifteen or twenty minutes; in chronic cases every other day is sufficient.  Immediate relief may usually be expected, and a cure in from one to three months.
 



 
CHRONIC HYPERTROPHIC RHINITIS
(Hypertrophy of the turbinated bones.  May follow acute attacks of coryza.)

SYMPTOMS
    Hoarseness; fullness in nose; nasal sounds; snoring; discharges of muco-pus in the pharynx; hearing may be impaired, also smell and taste; often accompanied by irritating
cough.

TREATMENT
    While this disease can be greatly benefited by Coryza Treatment, we cannot hope to cure the hypertrophy of the turbinated bones.
 



 
DIPHTHERITIC RHINITIS
(May accompany acute form.)

SYMPTOMS
    False membrane in nose; discharges acrid; excoriation of upper lip.

TREATMENT
    See Coryza.
 



 
CHRONIC POST-NASAL RHINITIS
(Extension of catarrh into pharynx.)

SYMPTOMS
    Tingling and sense of soreness at root of nose; pain in soft palate and posterior nares; frontal headache; flow of thick secretion into pharynx; impaired taste , smell, and hearing.

TREATMENT
    See Coryza.
 



 
RHINITIS SYCCA, OR DRY CATARRH
(Chronic form of nasal catarrh, with dryness of the mucous membrane.)

SYMPTOMS
    Tingling and dryness in the nostrils; faint musty odor; no discharge.
 
TREATMENT
    See Coryza.
 



 
ATROPHIC RHINITIS, OR OZENA
(A chronic form of nasal catarrh, with atrophy of the mucous membrane and ulceration
of the nasal cavities.)

SYMPTOMS
    Frontal headache; exceedingly fetid discharge; hawking and spitting of brownish-green crusts, often blood-tinged.

TREATMENT
    Can usually be benefited by Coryza Treatment, but cannot be cured if of a syphilitic nature.
 



 
RHINOLITH, OR NASAL CALCULUS
(Stone in the nose.)

SYMPTOMS
    May be fixed or movable, gray or greenish-brown in color, hard and rough; sometimes produces pain and reflex neuroses.

TREATMENT
    This disease can be greatly benefited by the Coryza Treatment, but an operation may be necessary to remove the stone.
 



 
NASAL POLYPI (POLYPUS OF THE NOSE)
(Pedunculated tumor in the nose.)

SYMPTOMS
    Snoring and oral breathing; aggravated by damp weather; sneezing,; and epistaxis.

TREATMENT
    See Coryza.
 



 
NASAL TUMORS
(May be Fibroma, Sarcoma, Osteoma, Enchondroma, or Carcinoma.)

SYMPTOMS
    Tumor painful and bleeds easily, causing fetid discharges; cervical glands swollen; stenosis and deformity are common, also epistaxis.

TREATMENT
    Same as Coryza Treatment.
 



 
NASAL ULCERS
(May be tuberculous or syphilitic.)

SYMPTOMS
    Stench of breath; stenosis; loss of smell; insomnia; emaciation.  If tuberculous, bleeds easily
    Not treated successfully by Osteopathy.
 



 
IDIOPATHIC RHINORRHEA
(Spontaneous mucous discharge from the nose.  Probably due to functional derangement of
the fifth cranial nerve.)

SYMPTOMS
    Discharge of yellowish water, which may cease as suddenly as it develops.

TREATMENT
    See Coryza.
 



 
ANTRUM ABSCESS
(Abscess of the Antrum of Hiohmore.)

SYMPTOMS
    Characteristic odor; putrid taste; nausea; anorexia; pain at root of nose; discharge of pus on leaning head forward; usually bad tooth in upper jaw.

TREATMENT
    See Coryza.
 



 
EPISTAXIS, OR NOSE-BLEED
(Hemorrhage of the nose.)

CAUSE
    May be caused by irritation, traumatism, or be due to constitutional conditions.

SYMPTOMS
    May be noise previous to its approach; may be fullness about head; headache; noise in ears; and vertigo.

TREATMENT
    The patient, in a sitting posture, should raise his arms as far as possible, at the same time placing one thumb upon each side of the nose, pressing quite strongly; the operator, standing in front, places the hands upon the sides of patient's neck, the fingers meeting over the three upper cervicals; tip the head strongly backward, pressing, hard with the fingers at the same instant, and hold in this position until the hemorrhage ceases.
 



 
 
The Throat
 

ACUTE LARYNGITIS, OR LARYNGEAL CATARRH
(Inflammation of the larynx, usually due to exposure or cold.)

SYMPTOMS
    Cough; hoarseness; fullness ,and dryness in the larynx; dyspnea at times; painful deglutition; ,and mucous expectoration.

TREATMENT
    1.  See General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Place the hand lightly upon the larynx, and vibrate gently two minutes.
    3.  Place the fingers of the left hand upon the angle of the second rib on the right side; draw patient's arm slowly above the head as patient inhales, pressing hard upon the angle of the rib as the arm is lowered with a backward motion; treat each rib in this manner until the lower border of the scapula is reached.  Treat the opposite side in a similar manner.
    Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should be given each day until recovery.
    Treatment must be given in a gentle, careful manner.  Patient should feel decidedly better after the first treatment.
 



 
DIPHTHERITIC LARYNGITIS
(Acute laryngitis with accumulation of false membrane in the fauces and nares.)

SYMPTOMS
    Similar to membranous croup; cervical glands enlarged little or no fever; albuminuria.

TREATMENT
    1.  See General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Place the hand on the larynx, and vibrate gently two minutes.
    3.  Place the finger in patient's mouth and manipulate carefully, but deep, the muscles in the immediate region of the fauces and nares.
    Treatment should be given each day, and immediate improvement can be expected.
 



 
CHRONIC LARYNGITIS
(May result from repeated attacks of acute form.  More common after middle life, and in males.)

SYMPTOMS
    Dryness and tickling in throat; hoarseness; irritable cough; thickening, of laryngeal structure, covered by a thick secretion.

TREATMENT
    1.  See Acute laryngitis.
    2.  Vibrate two minutes, with the hand pressed lightly over the bronchi.
    In chronic cases this treatment usually gives immediate relief, but requires about two or three months to effect a cure.  Treatment every other day.
 



 
LARYNGEAL EDEMA
(Dropsy of the larynx.   May accompany acute or chronic laryngitis, Bright's disease, erysipelas, diphtheria, and may be acute or chronic.)

SYMPTOMS
    Voice husky and suppressed; intense dyspnea and cough; symptoms of obstruction; respiration hurried and spasmodic; pulse small, rapid, and irregular eyes prominent; face flushed and anxious.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Place the patient on the side; beginning at the upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the entire length of the spine, being very thorough in the lumbar region.
    3.  Flex the limbs strongly against the abdomen, giving strong abduction of the knee as they are extended with a light jerk.
    4.  Vibrate one minute each of the following organs: lungs, stomach, liver, and kidneys.
    5.  Place the left hand beneath the patient's shoulders, the fingers upon the angle of the second rib on the right side; draw the right arm strongly but slowly above the head as the patient inhales, pressing hard upon the rib as the arm is lowered with a backward motion; treat each rib in a similar manner until the lower border of the scapula is reached.  Repeat the operation on the opposite side.
    Treatment should be given each day until recovery.
 



 
TUBERCULOUS LARYNGITIS
(May be acute or chronic.)

SYMPTOMS
    Painful deglutition; dysphonia; pain in respiration; at times thickening, of the epiglottis; ulceration; tubercle bacilli may be detected in the secretions.
    Not treated successfully by Osteopathy.
 



 
SUBMUCOUS LARYNGITIS
(Inflammation extending to the submucous cellular tissue of the larynx.  May be acute or chronic.)

SYMPTOMS
    Same as laryngitis with stenosis.

TREATMENT
    1.  See Acute Laryngitis.
    2.  See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation.
 



 
LEGMONOUS LARYNGITIS, OR PERICHONDRITIS
(Suppurative inflammation of the cartilages of the larynx.)

SYMPTOMS
    Cough and hoarseness; pain increased by moving the larynx, as in speaking or swallowing; discharge of pus; necrosed cartilage; if arytenoid cartilage is involved, pain extends towards the ears; if cricoid, pain on swallowing solid food, and dyspnea; if thyroid, abscess may be seen in the larynx.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Thorough vibration of the larynx two minutes.
    3.  Place the patient on a stool; with the knee of the operator between the scapulae about the third dorsal, draw the patient's arms slowly and strongly above the head as the lungs are filled to their fullest capacity; lower the arms with a backward motion, pressing hard at the  same instant with the knee.
    Treatment should be given each day.
 



 
LARYNGISMUS STRIDULUS, OR LARYNGOSPASM
(Neurosis of the larynx, with spasmodic contraction of the glottis; usually in poorly nourished children.)

SYMPTOMS
    Ringing croupy cough; dyspnea; face at first pallid, becoming livid; eyes stare; head drawn backward; spine arched; cold perspiration on forehead; convulsions may occur.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Thorough General Treatment.
 



 
PSEUDO-MEMBRANOUS LARYNGITIS, OR MEMBRANOUS CROUP
(Inflammation of the larynx, with formation of false membrane.)

SYMPTOMS
    Fretfulness, feverishness, cold in the head, and slight hoarseness, increasing towards evening and in the early night.  Sometimes, however, without a single warning symptom, the child startles us in the night with a hoarse, ringing cough, which cannot be so described as to be recognized, but which no one who has ever heard it can fail to know again.  There is a sense of suffocation, a hurried, hoarse, and hissing breathing, as if the air were drawn into the lungs and expelled through too small an opening in some instrument, which is the fact, for such an instrument is the accumulated phlegm in the larynx.  When there is much fever and inflammation, the tendency to the formation of false membrane is very slight; whereas, in cases that seem mild at the beginning the disease often passes to the membranous stage unsuspected.
    Peculiar ringing cough, becoming muffled; great difficulty in breathing; suffocating paroxysms; protrusion of the eyeballs; extreme restlessness and agitation; nostrils dilated; flushed cheeks; grasping at support; clutching at neck; flakes of membrane; casts of trachea, which may be expectorated; elevation of temperature.

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Place the finger in the mouth, and gently manipulate the false membrane as thoroughly as     possible.
    3.  Draw the arms strongly above the head, pressing upon the second dorsal vertebra as they are lowered with a backward motion.
    4.  Place the hand upon the neck and bronchi, and vibrate gently two minutes.
    This treatment is exceedingly successful in all cases of membranous croup, relaxing, as it does, the muscles, freeing the circulation, and causing the false membrane to be ejected.
 



 
SPASMODIC CROUP, OR CATARRHAL CROUP
(Catarrhal laryngitis, with spasms of the larynx)

SYMPTOMS
    Hoarseness and cough in the evening, cough becoming ringing and metallic toward midnight, with paroxysms of suffocation; may occur three or four nights in succession.

TREATMENT
    See Membranous Croup, omitting No. 2.
 



 
LARYNGEAL  TUMOR
(May be malignant or benign.)

SYMPTOMS
    Dysphonia or aphonia; dyspnea; may be irritating cough; and cachexia.

TREATMENT
    1.  See General Treatment of the Neck being very thorough in the region of the tumor.
    2.  Place the hand over tumor, and vibrate gently two minutes.
    3.  Seat the patient upon a stool; the operator places his knee between the scapula at about the second or third dorsal; draw the arms strongly above the head as the patient inhales, pressing hard with the knee as the arms are lowered with a backward motion.
    Treatment should be given each day.
    This disease is often benefited by the above treatment.
 



 
LARYNGEAL SYPHILIS
(Syphilitic affection of the larynx.)

SYMPTOMS
    Hoarseness caused by catarrh or ulcerations; articulation husky; cough; difficult deglutition; whitish-gray mucous patches; round prominences on either side of the glottis; deep circular ulcers overlaid with whitish-yellow deposits; no pain.

TREATMENT
    See Laryngeal Tumor, giving thorough vibration over larynx and trachea.
    This disease is often benefited by the above treatment.
 



 
ACUTE PHARYNGITIS, OR SORE THROAT
(Inflammation of the pharynx.  Usually follows cold or exposure.)

SYMPTOMS
    Painful deglutition; sense of dryness and constant desire to hawk and cough; may involve the tonsils; may be slight deafness; stiffness of the neck and enlargement of the cervical glands; chilliness and fever; mucous membrane congested, dry, and glistening; uvula may be swollen
 
TREATMENT
    See Acute Laryngeal.
 



 
CHRONIC PHARYNGITIS
(Follows acute attacks, and may be accompanied by nasal catarrh.)

SYMPTOMS
    Relaxation of the mucous membrane, with dilatation of the veins; membrane, dry, glistening, and covered with a thick secretion.

TREATMENT
    See Acute Laryngitis.
    Treatment should be given every other day.  Immediate benefit may be expected, and a continuation of the treatment will usually effect a cure.
 



 
GANGRENOUS PHARYNGITIS, OR PUTRID SORE THROAT
(Mortification of the pharyngeal tissues.  May follow ordinary pharyngitis.)

SYMPTOMS
    Mucous membrane of the tonsils inflamed, also walls of the pharynx, soon becoming covered with gangrenous patches; may extend to the esophagus, larynx and nares; may be erosion of blood vessels, causing fatal hemorrhage.

TREATMENT
    This disease, if taken in its early stages, is very easily cured by osteopathic treatment.
    See General Treatment of the Neck.
    Treatment should be given each day.
 



 
RETRO-PHARYNGEAL ABSCESS
(Suppuration in the retro-pharyngeal tissues.  More common in children.)

SYMPTOMS
    Enlargement of cervical glands; stiffness of the neck; inability to swallow; high fever; noisy breathing; suffocating paroxysms; little or no cough; head often drawn back.
 
TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Vibrate one minute over abscess.
    3.  Place the patient on the side; beginning at the upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the entire length of the spinal column, gently but deep.  Treat the opposite side in a similar manner.
    4.  Place the left hand under the right shoulder, the fingers upon the angle of the second rib; draw the right arm slowly but strongly above the head as the patient inhales, and lower the arm with a backward motion, pressing, hard upon the angle of the rib.  Treat the third, fourth, and fifth rib in a similar manner.  Repeat the operation upon the opposite side.
    5.  Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, fingertips almost meeting over the spines of the upper cervicals; tip the head backward, and press hard with the fingers three or four minutes (see vaso-motor).
    Treatment should be given each day.
 



 
TRACHITIS
(Inflammation of the trachea.  May come from larynx or bronchi by extension.)

TREATMENT
    General Treatment of the Neck.
 



 
TRACHELAGRA
(Gout in the neck.)

TREATMENT
    General Treatment of the Neck.
 



 
TRACHELISMUS
(Spasms of the cervical muscles.)

TREATMENT
    General Treatment of the Neck.
 



 
TRACHEAL STENOSIS
(Contraction of the trachea.  May be due pressure caused by enlargement of glands.)

SYMPTOMS
    Peculiar whistling, wheezing sound; voice weak and muffled; difficult breathing; inspiration obstructed; expiration easy.

TREATMENT
    1.  See General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Thorough vibration of the trachea.
 



 
ACUTE ESOPHAGITIS
(Inflammation of the esophagus due to traumatism.)

SYMPTOMS
    Raw, burning pain, aggravated by speaking; expectoration of a frothy, glairy mucus, with blood and shreds of membrane.

TREATMENT
    1.  Place the patient on the back; manipulate carefully the muscles in the region of the traumatism.  It is also well to manipulate all the muscles in the front and sides of the neck.
    2.  Gentle vibration of the esophagus.
 



 
CHRONIC ESOPHAGITIS
(May follow an acute attack.)

SYMPTOMS
    Painful deglutition; liquids readily swallowed, but solids with great difficulty; expectoration of a viscid mucus.

TREATMENT
    See Acute Esophagitis.
    Patient always derives benefit from this treatment; a cure can hardly be expected.
 



 
ESOPHAGEAL ABSCESS
(May develop from acute esophagitis.)

SYMPTOMS
    Development slow; pain increased on movement of the neck; rigors and fever.

TREATMENT
    1.  Manipulate very gently and carefully the muscles of the neck, being very particular to give no unnecessary pain.
    2.  Give gentle extension and rotation of the neck.
    3.  Place the hand over the abscess and vibrate gently one minute.
 



 
ESOPHAGEAL STRICTURE
(Contraction of the esophagus, due to the healing of an ulcer.)

SYMPTOMS
    Difficult deglutition; impaired nutrition; anemia.
    Not treated successfully by Osteopathy.
 



 
ESOPHAGEAL DILATATION
(Expansion of the esophagus.)

SYMPTOMS
    Regurgitation of food, which is either alkaline or neutral; sense of distention, with heat and burning; fetid breath.
    Not treated successfully by Osteopathy.
 



 
FOLLICULAR TONSILLITIS
(Inflammation of the lining membrane of the lacunae, or ducts of the tonsils.)

SYMPTOMS
    Frontal headache; severe pain in back and limbs; pain in throat, and difficult deglutition; chilly sensation and high temperature; tonsils swollen and throat dry and burning; yellowish-white exudation on the crypts; voice becomes nasal; pulse rapid and tongue coated.

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck, being particular to manipulate the tonsils gently but thoroughly.
    2.  Place the patient on the side; beginning at the upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the entire length of the spinal column gently, but very deep.  Treat the opposite side in a similar manner.
    3.  Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the finger-tips, almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tip the head backward, pressing gently for three or four minutes upon the vaso-motor.
    Treatment should be given each day.
 



 
PARENCHYMATOUS TONSILLITIS, AMYGDALITIS, OR QUINSY
(Inflammation of the substance of the tonsils.  May be primary or secondary.)

SYMPTOMS
    Usually only one tonsil affected, the other may follow; tonsils swollen; voice nasal; difficult deglutition; severe pain, which may extend to the ear; tenderness beneath the angle of the jaw on pressure; chill; high fever; increased secretion of saliva.

TREATMENT
    See Follicular Tonsillitis.
 



 
CHRONIC TONSILLITIS, OR ENLARGED TONSILS
(May be due to repeated attacks of acute form.)

SYMPTOMS
    Tonsils enlarged and irregular in shape; may be snoring and defective hearing.

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck kneading and manipulating the enlarged tonsil in a very thorough manner.
    2.  Place the fingers upon the enlarged tonsil, and give thorough vibration two minutes.
 



 
HERPETIC TONSILLITIS, OR HERPETIC SORE THROAT
(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the tonsils, palate, uvula, and pharynx, characterized
by eruption of the herpetic vesicles.)

SYMPTOMS
    May be chill, followed by fever; pain in deglutition; throat dry and hot; eruptions rupture, leaving circular ulcers, which coalesce and become covered with fibrinous exudation.

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck manipulating very thoroughly the tonsils, palate, uvula, and pharynx.
    2.  In case of fever, hold the vaso-motor three or four minutes.
 



 
GLOSSITIS
(Inflammation of the tongue.  May be acute or chronic.)

SYMPTOMS
    Tongue swollen, red, and painful; impairment of speech and deglutition.

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Manipulate the tongue, giving it strong extension, and endeavoring, in any possible manner, to free its circulation.
 



 
GLOSSANTHRAX
(Malignant pustule upon the tongue.)

SYMPTOMS
    Same as anthrax in general; appearance of crust of dead tissue on the tongue.
    Not treated by osteopaths.
 



 
GLOSSOPHYTIA, NIGRITIES, OR BLACK TONGUE
(Dark discoloration of the tongue from epithelium accumulation.)

SYMPTOMS
    Papillae discolored, thickened, and elongated; appearance of hairy growth on the tongue; scaling takes place.
    Not treated by osteopaths.
 



 
LEUXOPLAXIA LINGUALIS
(Peculiar chronic affection of the tongue, characterized by horny whitish patches on the
surface.  May affect the buccal mucous membrane.)
 
    Not treated by osteopaths.
 


 
GLOSSAL ULCER
(May be Simple, Dyspeptic, Aphthous, or Traumatic.)

SYMPTOMS
    Simple ulcer forms in center of the tongue or inflamed area, and is smooth, red, and glazed.
    Dyspeptic or catarrhal ulcer occurs on the tip or dorsum near the tip, and is small, superficial, red, and irritable.
    Aphthous ulcer has same symptoms as when occurring in the mouth.  Found both in adults and children.
    Traumatic ulcer may occur from bad teeth. When active, may be mistaken for syphilitic, tuberculous, or cancerous ulcer.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck, being particularly thorough in the front and sides, working as deeply as possible under the inferior maxillary.
    2.  Thorough manipulation of the tongue, working as deeply around the root as possible, and giving the tongue thorough extension.
    Treatment should be given each day.
 



 
CATARRHAL STOMATITIS
(Catarrhal inflammation of the mucous membrane of the mouth.  May be due to extension from
adjacent disease.)

SYMPTOMS
    Redness and swelling; increased secretion and heat; taste impaired and breath fetid.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck, being very thorough in the front and sides, working very deeply under the inferior maxillary.
    2.  Place the index finger in patient's mouth, and manipulate late the mucous membrane carefully but thoroughly.
    Treatment should be given each day.
 



 
APHTHOUS STOMATITIS, OR APHTHAE
(Local area of inflammation in the mouth, followed by ulceration.)

SYMPTOMS
    Yellowish-white spots dotted over the mucous membrane inside the cheeks and roof of mouth along the tongue and gum.

TREATMENT
    See Catarrhal Stomatitis.
 



 
ULCERATIVE STOMATITIS, OR NOMA
(Another form of ulceration attending inflammation of the mouth.  May accompany chronic diarrhea, and is peculiar to unsanitary conditions.)

SYMPTOMS
    Inflammation more pronounced on the gums, which are swollen, red, and covered with ulcers, on which appears a yellowish material; flow of saliva is increased and acid in reaction.

TREATMENT
    See Catarrhal Stomatitis.
 



 
GANGRENOUS STOMATITIS, OR CANCRUM ORIS
(Gangrenous inflammation of the gums, mucous membrane, and deep tissues of the cheeks.
Peculiar to children.)

SYMPTOMS
    At first small, dark, red, hard spot on the cheek, becoming purple; cheek becomes swollen, tense. and brawny; blister forms, which soon breaks, with rapid ulceration; ulcer dark, and soon perforates the cheek; characteristic odor.
    Not treated successfully by Osteopathy.
 



 
PARASITIC STOMATITIS, OR THRUSH
(Mycotic inflammation of the mucous membrane of the mouth and throat.  Peculiar to children.)

SYMPTOMS
    Raised white patches, appearing like small curds of milk; secretion of mouth acid in reaction.

TREATMENT
    1.  General Treatment of the Neck.
    2.  Careful manipulation of the mucous membrane of the mouth and throat with the index finger.
 



 
STOMATITIS MATERNA, OR NURSING SORE MOUTH
(Painful, solitary ulcers in mucous membrane of lips and cheeks of nursing women.)

TREATMENT
    1.  Thorough General Treatment of the Neck, working as deeply as possible under the inferior maxillary.
    2.  With the index finger manipulate thoroughly the mucous membrane of the mouth, being particularly thorough in the region of the ulcer.
    Treatment should be given every day; and never fails to give immediate relief, and continuation of the treatment a speedy cure.
 



 
MERCURIAL STOMATITIS PTYALISM, OR SALIVATION
(Due to medicinal ingestion of large quantities of mercury, affecting the gums and salivary glands.)

SYMPTOMS
    The gums swollen, red, sore, and bleed easily; teeth become loosened; breath fetid; pain in mastication; tongue may be swollen.

TREATMENT
    Is often benefited by thorough General Treatment of the Neck.