Spondylotherapy Simplified
Alva Emery Gregory, M.D.
1922

CHAPTER 2: VISCERA AND THEIR CONTROL
 
 
In this portion of this condensed work, we wish to give you the centers which influence each and every viscus and part of the body, and to mention briefly the nature of the influence exerted by each of the different spinal centers or segments upon the parts which they supply.

For convenience to the practitioner, we have arranged and described the treatment of the different viscera and parts in alphabetical order so that this work may serve as a ready reference to the doctor who is busy in his practice.
 

ADRENALS

Centers for Constriction

The adrenals or suprarenal capsules of the kidney may be constricted or dilated by spinal concussion or by the use of the sinusoidal current or other method of stimulation.

Concussion or the sinusoidal current over the fifth and sixth thoracic spinous processes or the spinal segment contained therein will cause constriction of the adrenals.

Sinusoidalization or concussion over these centers, especially constrict the parenchyma of the adrenals.

Concussion over the spinous or transverse process of the seventh cervical or of the first, second and third lumbar will cause a decided vaso-constriction of the suprarenal capsules, especially of the blood vessels thereof.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion over the spinous or transverse processes of the tenth and eleventh thoracic vertebrae will cause vaso-dilation of the blood vessels and dilation of the parenchyma of the adrenals or suprarenal capsules.
 

AORTA

The aorta may be constricted or it may be dilated by concussion, applied over specific centers, or by other methods of stimulation.

Centers for Constriction

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied over spinous or transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebrae will cause the most decided constriction of the musculature and vessels of the walls of the thoracic and abdominal aorta.

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied over the spinous or transverse processes of the second to the eighth thoracic vertebrae inclusive, will produce constriction of the abdominal portion of the aorta and the same treatment applied to the first, second and third lumbar vertebrae, will cause vaso-constriction of the vessels of the walls of the abdominal aorta.

Centers for Dilation

Dilation of the aorta may be caused by concussion of the ninth to twelfth thoracic spines or transverse processes.

Centers of Dilation

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied to the spinous or transverse processes of the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth thoracic vertebrae will cause dilation of the heart and the aorta.
 

ANEURISM

In the treatment of aneurism rest is essential to success.  Exertions of any kind and exercise to any extent is very detrimental to recovery.

Centers for Constriction

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied over the spinous or transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra excites the most efficient vaso-constriction of the heart and aorta, and is the most potent means of overcoming aneurism.

Concussion is a more potent and efficient method of treatment than is the sinusoidal stimulation for aortic aneurism.

Concussion and sinusoidal stimulation applied over the second to eighth thoracic vertebrae inclusive, in addition to the seventh cervical concussion will assist greatly in overcoming abdominal aneurysm.

Concussion and stimulation of the sinusoidal current applied over the first, second and third lumbar vertebrae inclusive, causes constriction of the vasomotor and parenchymatous tissues of the abdominal contents and this measure will also assist and hasten recovery from aneurismal enlargements of the abdominal aorta.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation over the spinous or transverse processes of the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth thoracic vertebrae will cause vasodilation of the vessels and parenchyma of the abdominal viscera, and increase the size of an aneurysm and augment its symptoms.  Concussion to excite dilation of a supposed aneurysmal tumor is an important diagnostic procedure.
 

APPENDIX

Centers for Constriction

The appendix may be caused to constrict by concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied to the seventh cervical vertebra.

The seventh cervical treatment may be augmented by concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied to the upper three lumbar segments which portions contain the centers of origin of vaso-constrictor nerves supplying the appendix.

These measures of treatment will increase the symptoms of appendicitis and are therefore diagnostic.

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation over the eighth and ninth thoracic vertebrae will cause contraction of the parenchyma of the appendix and adjacent tissues.

Center for Dilation

Concussion and other stimulation applied over the eleventh dorsal or thoracic spinal segment will cause decided dilation of the appendix and adjacent tissues and allay the cramps and spasms and distressing symptoms of appendicitis.

Stimulation of this spinal segment causes dilation of the bowels generally and aids greatly in relieving appendicitis without an operation.
 

THE BLADDER

Centers for Constriction

The rapid sinusoidal current applied to the first or to the fifth lumbar spinal segment will excite contraction of the muscular walls of the bladder.

Concussion given to the spinous or transverse processes of the upper three lumbar vertebrae will stimulate the bladder walls and the blood vessels thereof.

Concussion applied over the transverse processes or spine of the ninth thoracic vertebra will stimulate the spinal center or origin of the first lumbar pair of nerves and thus stimulate the musculature of the bladder walls.
 

BLOOD VESSELS

Centers for Constriction

Concussion applied vigorously to the seventh cervical vertebra will produce the most decided vasomotor constrictor impulses of the blood vessels generally in all parts of the body.

Concussion applied to the spinous or transverse processes of the thoracic vertebrae, from the second to the eighth inclusive will excite stimulation and vasoconstriction of the splanchnics regions.

Concussion given to the upper three lumbar segments of the spinal column produces vaso-constriction of the blood vessels and of the parenchyma of the viscera of the abdominal cavity and also of the pelvic cavity.

The use of the sinusoidal current applied over the spinal segments mentioned above will stimulate contraction to a less degree than will the vigorous concussion.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion applied, by rather slow but firm and strong concussion strokes, to stimulate the nerve centers contained in the spinal cord and within the neural arches of the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth thoracic vertebrae, will cause a dilation of the blood vessels generally, and especially of the abdominal cavity or contents.
 

CENTERS CONTROLLING BLOOD PRESSURE

Decreasing Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, due to cardiac weakness, is best relieved by concussion over the spinous or transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra.

High blood pressure is usually and most easily reduced by concussion, nerve pressure or sinusoidal stimulation, applied to the spinous or transverse processes or between the transverse processes of the third and fourth thoracic vertebrae.

Increasing Blood Pressure

Concussion and other stimulation administered to the upper three lumbar segments of the spinal column will excite contraction of the blood vessels of the splanchnic regions which will act mechanically on the blood pressure to increase it.

Concussion applied to the third and fourth cervical segments of the spinal column will, by stimulation of the centers of origin of the phrenic nerves, effect an increase of the blood pressure.
 

THE BRAIN

Centers for Constriction

The blood vessels of the brain may be caused to contract by the administration of concussion to the seventh cervical vertebra.

Concussion over the second cervical vertebra will also effect stimulation and contraction of the blood vessels of the brain substance.
 

THE BREASTS

Centers to Stimulate

The secretion of the mammary glands may be easily and readily increased by the use of spinal concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied to stimulate the spinal centers situated in the neural arches of the third and fourth thoracic segments of the spinal column.

Centers for Constriction

Concussion administered to stimulate the centers of origin of the second pair of thoracic nerves situated in the neural arch of the seventh cervical vertebra will excite contraction of the blood vessels of the mammary glands.  This measure will diminish the secretion of lacteal fluids.
 

THE CARDIA

The cardia is the upper orifice of the stomach and it is subject to spasmodic contraction in some patients, under certain conditions when swallowing food.

Centers for Constriction

A contraction of the cardia may be caused by stimulation of the spinal origin of the second and third thoracic pairs of nerves by concussion or the use of the rapid sinusoidal current.

Concussion applied to the fifth thoracic spine will cause dilation of the pylorus and contraction of the cardia.

Nerve pressure upon the right side of the fourth thoracic spine will cause dilation of the pylorus and contraction of the cardia.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation, affecting the spinal origin of the fifth and sixth pairs of spinal nerves, by being applied over the third spinal segment of the spinal column, will cause dilation of the upper orifice of the stomach.

This will readily relieve choking attacks.
 

THE COLON

Centers to Stimulate

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation, applied over the spinal nerve centers of origin contained in the neural arches of the thoracic vertebrae, from the second to the eighth inclusive, will stimulate the splanchnic nerves and the viscera which they supply, among which are the different portions of the colon.

Centers for Constriction

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation, applied to the upper three segments of the lumbar portion of the spinal column, will cause a decided contraction of the colon and intestines, more especially is this true of the treatment applied to the second lumbar segment.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion given over the spinous or transverse processes of the eleventh thoracic vertebra causes a general dilation of the abdominal viscera.

Nerve pressure applied to the spinal nerves or near their spinal exit will cause dilation of the colon, and the sites for the application of pressure have been established according to Abrams as follows:

Bilateral nerve pressure on the sides of the tenth thoracic vertebra will cause dilation of the duodenum.

Bilateral nerve pressure by the side of the eleventh thoracic vertebra will induce dilation of the sigmoid flexure.

Bilateral nerve pressure by the side of the twelfth thoracic vertebra causes dilation of the ascending colon, also of the cecum and attached ileum.

Bilateral nerve pressure by the side of the first lumbar vertebra causes a dilation of the descending colon.

Bilateral nerve pressure by the side of the fourth vertebra causes a dilation of the transverse colon.
 

THE DIAPHRAGM

The diaphragm may be stimulated and will become more prominent at its borders, on one or both sides of the epigastrium, under the costal borders, when intermittent pressure is applied between the second and third cervical vertebrae.  The best results may be obtained when the patient is recumbent with the knees flexed.

This phenomenon is due to stimulation of the origin of one of the spinal branches of the phrenic nerve.
 

DUODENUM

See centers mentioned under heading of the colon.
 

THE EARS

The vagus tone may be increased by intermittent concussion of the seventh cervical vertebra and this will augment the acuteness of the sense of hearing.

Concussion of the second cervical vertebra will stimulate the auditory nerves through branches of the cervical nerves adjoining them.

Nerve pressure applied in the interspace between the third and fourth thoracic spinous or rather transverse processes will in a short time diminish vagus tone and this will diminish the acuteness of the sense of hearing.
 

ESOPHAGUS

Centers for Constriction.

Concussion of the seventh cervical vertebra, or the use of sinusoidal stimulation upon the nerve center of origin contained in the neural arch thereof will cause a contraction of the esophagus.  And so will nerve pressure applied at the sides of the interspace between the spinous processes of the seventh cervical and the first dorsal spines.

A similar result may be elicited by concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the upper three dorsal segments or by nerve pressure applied to the first three pairs of spinal nerves at or near their spinal exit from just below the upper three thoracic vertebrae.

Pressure in the paravertebral spaces between the third and fourth thoracic vertebrae produces dilation of the cardia and contraction of the esophagus.

Centers of Dilation

Stimulation of the fifth segment of the thoracic portion of the spinal column by concussion or sinusoidal stimulation will cause dilation of the pylorus and at the same time contract the cardia which phenomenon is associated with dilation of the esophagus.
 

THE EYES

The eyes may be affected by spinal treatment which will stimulate spinal nerves which send communicating branches to the cranial nerves and the terminal ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system connected therewith.

Centers for Stimulation

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the first and second cervical segments affects the eyes because of the consequent stimulation of the vagal nerves, and also because of the effect of the stimulation of the optic nerves through the channel of branches from first cervical nerves, joining the optic and other cranial nerves.

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the seventh cervical segment of the spinal column increases the acuteness of vision which is due no doubt to the effect upon the capillary circulation.

The same treatment applied to the thoracic segments from the second to the fourth inclusive causes dilation of the pupils of the eyes.

Spinal treatment or stimulation, given to the lower thoracic vertebrae, from the sixth to the tenth, affects the pneumogastric nerves, because of the connection of the spinal nerves from these segments with the terminal afferent fibers of the pneumogastric nerves.

Nerve pressure applied to the first pair of lumbar nerves at or near their spinal exit, especially on the right side, will effect the eyelids and secretion of tears.
 

GALL BLADDER

Centers for Contraction

Concussion, nerve pressure or sinusoidalization, administered to the ninth and tenth thoracic segments of the spinal column, will cause dilation of the gall bladder.

The same treatment applied to the upper lumbar portion of the spinal column, including the first, second and third segments, will excite contraction of the gall bladder.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion, nerve pressure or sinusoidalization, administered to the ninth and tenth thoracic segments of the spinal column, will cause dilation of the gall bladder.
 

THE HEART

Spinal concussion is perhaps one of the most potent and effectual methods of immediately affecting the action of the heart that has ever been discovered or used by practitioners of the healing art.

We and readily and easily cause contraction, dilation, inhibition or acceleration of the heartís action by stimulation which is best excited by spinal concussion.

The action of the heart may be started after fainting, paralysis from chloroform or resuscitated from drowning or from asphyxia from different causes, and the action of the heart may be greatly increased in strength and in a quick and expedient manner by the use of spinal concussion.

Centers for Restoration of the Heart's Action

Rapid concussion of the seventh cervical vertebral spinous transverse processes will start the heart to action after syncope of brief duration almost instantaneously, and the marked characteristic of the heart's action, when so started, is the strength of the beat.

Spinal concussion or other stimulation, especially adjustment, of the fourth thoracic spinal segment will also excite cardiac action, after most forms of asphyxia, very quickly and the heart's action when so started seems to be under perfect inhibitory control.

Concussion of the middle cervical vertebrae especially the third and fourth, or the use of other methods of stimulating the phrenic nerves, will resuscitate a failing heart very quickly, and at the same time greatly accelerate the cardiac action and consequently the rate of the pulse.

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the first and second segments of the cervical portion of the spinal column will initiate the heart's action after syncope and also strengthen and inhibit its action, because of its influence upon the vagal nerves.

Centers for Contraction

Spinal concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the seventh cervical spinal segment will cause the most decided contraction of the cardiac walls and blood vessels, and this is the center depended upon for results in treatment of cardiac dilation and valvular insufficiency and syncope or asphyxia.

Centers for Dilation

Spinal concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the lower segments of the spinal column from the ninth to the twelfth inclusive, will cause decided dilation of the cardiac wall and the thoracic and abdominal aorta, and are the chief centers for cardiac dilation.

Centers for Acceleration

Spinal concussion or sinusoidal stimulation or paravertebral nerve pressure applied to the third and fourth cervical segments of the spine will accelerate or quicken the rate of the cardiac action and consequently the pulse rate.

Centers for Inhibition

Stimulation of the centers of origin of spinal contained in the neural arch of the second thoracic vertebra, by means of concussion or sinusoidal currents, seem to increase the inhibitory control of the vagal nerves over the rate of the action of the heart, therefore the second thoracic is the center for inhibition according to the best authorities.

If the rate of the heart beat is due, to compensatory action, on account of weakness of the heart, then the rate of the cardiac action may be reduced by concussion or other stimulation of the seventh cervical segment of the spine.
 

THE INTESTINES

Centers for Constriction

Spinal concussion and other methods of stimulation applied to the upper three lumbar segments of the spine cause contraction of the intestines.

Stimulation of the middle dorsal segments of the spine from the second to the eighth inclusive, by concussion or sinusoidalization, will stimulate the peristalsis of the entire splanchnic area.

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine, or transverse processes, will augment diminished splanchnic tone due to subnormal vagus tone.

Centers for Dilation

Concussion of the eleventh dorsal spine or stimulation by paravertebral nerve pressure or the sinusoidal current will cause dilation of the intestines, and this is an excellent measure in the treatment of spastic constipation and in the treatment of appendicitis.
 

THE KIDNEYS

Centers for Contraction

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine or transverse processes, which stimulates the spinal centers of origin of the second thoracic pair of spinal nerves will produce the most decided vasomotor constriction of the blood vessels and an anemic condition of the kidneys and thus cause a decrease of the kidney excretion and a constriction of the size of them.

Rapid concussion or sinusoidal currents applied to the sixth, seventh and eighth thoracic segments of the spine, will induce contraction of the parenchymatous tissues of the kidneys and thus cause stimulation of them.

Concussion and other stimulation of the upper three lumbar segments of the spine will cause contraction of the blood vessels and the parenchymatous tissues of the renal organs.

Centers of Dilation

Stimulation of the tenth and the eleventh thoracic segments of the spine, by nerve pressure, spinal concussion or sinusoidal stimulation will cause dilation of the parenchyma and of the blood vessels of the kidneys, and this will increase their action and cause the appearance of albumen, if continued, in the secretion of a kidney which is in normal condition until after the beginning of the treatment.
 

THE LARYNX

Centers for Constriction

Rapid spinal concussion of the seventh cervical spine or transverse processes will induce a constricted feeling and contraction of the tissues of the larynx and will relieve laryngeal catarrh and hyperaenemic conditions by relieving the capillary engorgement.

Nerve pressure, or the sinusoidal current applied so as to affect the same nerves, will produce no doubt the same or similar results to those obtained by the rapid concussion.
 

THE LIVER

Centers for Contraction

The liver may be constricted by rapid intermittent concussion of the seventh cervical spine or the transverse processes which causes a vaso-motor constriction of the portal circulation.

Stimulation of the middle thoracic segments from the second to the eighth by intermittent sessions of concussion will stimulate the entire splanchnic zones, but when the treatment is confined to the fourth thoracic spine or transverse processes the stimulation will then directly affect and contract the hepatic organ.

Concussion, rapid but intermittent, applied to the upper three lumbar segments of the spine will cause constriction of the blood vessels and of the parenchyma of the liver.

Nerve pressure or sinusoidal stimulation affecting the same nerves will produce similar results upon the hepatic organ.

Center for Dilation

The eleventh thoracic vertebra is the center for dilation of the liver, and the phenomena of dilation of the vessels and tissues occurs when the centers of origin of the nerves of this segment is stimulated by the use of concussion, nerve pressure or the sinusoidal current.
 

THE LUNGS

Centers for Contraction

Concussion over the third, fourth and fifth cervical segments of the spine will cause a contraction of the longitudinal fibers of the pulmonary air passages and other tissues of the lungs, because of the stimulation of the centers of origin of the phrenic nerves.

Sinusoidal stimulation of the fourth and fifth cervical segments will prove very efficient in exciting contraction of the lungs.

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine or transverse processes will cause diminution of the amount of blood in the pulmonary tissues, and will produce an anemic condition, which is favorable to the development of tubercular infections, if too persistently used and continued too long.

Centers for Dilation

Stimulation of the middle third of the dorsal portion of the spine, from the fifth to the eighth inclusive, by concussion or sinusoidalization will cause dilation of the lungs and an increase in the amount of their vascular contents.  This is due perhaps to the contraction of the splanchnic zone and consequent mechanical pressure of their vascular contents into the lungs.

Concussion of the first and second cervical vertebrae will affect the lungs also because of the influence of communicating branches which are given to the vagus nerves.
 

NASAL CAVITY

Centers for Constriction

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine or transverse processes will cause vaso-constriction of the capillary circulation of the lining of the nasal mucous membranes.  And this is an excellent auxiliary remedy in the treatment of reflex nasal asthma, nasal catarrh, both acute and chronic.

The sense of smell is modified by concussion of the seventh cervical spine or by any other method of increasing or decreasing vagus tone.
 

THE OVARIES

Center for Contraction

Concussion of the spinous or transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra causes constriction of the blood vessels of the pelvic organs generally.

Concussion stimulation of the upper three lumbar segments of the spine will cause a decided contraction of the parenchyma of the ovaries.

Rapid sinusoidal stimulation of the centers of origin of the nerves originating in the tenth, eleventh and twelfth thoracic segments will cause stimulation of the tissues and musculature of the pelvic viscera, and a return of the ovaries, which are prolapsed, to their normal situation.
 

THE PANCREAS

Centers for Contraction

Rapid but intermittent concussion applied to the spinous or transverse processes of the fourth, fifth and sixth thoracic vertebrae, especially to the fifth, will stimulate the centers of origin of the nerve supply to the pancreas.

Centers of Dilation

Stimulation of the centers of origin of spinal nerves contained within the neural arches of the tenth and eleventh thoracic vertebrae by spinal concussion or by use of nerve pressure or rapid sinusoidal currents, will cause a decided dilation of the blood vessels and of the parenchyma of the pancreas.

To Increase Pancreatic Juice

An increase of the secretion and supply of the pancreatic fluids may be obtained by concussion of the tenth thoracic spine or transverse processes, which will increase the capacity and quantity of the blood therein, and thus cause increased cellular or glandular secretions.

Alternate intermittent concussion of the fifth thoracic segment to constrict and the tenth thoracic vertebra to dilate the pancreas will cause the greatest secretion and flow of the pancreatic fluid.
 

THE PHARYNX

Constriction Center

Concussion of the spine of the seventh cervical vertebra or of the transverse processes thereof will cause constriction of the capillary vessels of the mucous surfaces of the pharynx.

Sinusoidal stimulation applied to the paravertebral areas beside of, and adjacent to, the spine of the seventh cervical vertebra, will produce constriction of the capillary, circulation of the pharyngeal mucous membranes.

Nerve pressure given to the nerves existing on either side of the seventh cervical spine will also cause vasoconstriction of the pharyngeal mucous membranes.

Centers for Stimulation

Concussion stimulation applied to the upper two cervical vertebrae will increase the nerve impulses of the nerves of the cervical plexus and thus we may stimulate the tissues of the pharynx which they help supply.
 

PROSTATE GLAND

Constricting Center

The prostate gland, in a great percentage of men of sixty or more years, will become hypertrophied and obstruct the passage of the bladder contents.

Concussion of the spine or transverse processes of the twelfth thoracic vertebra will cause contraction of the prostate gland.

The rapid sinusoidal modality applied by placing one electrode over the twelfth thoracic vertebra and the other over the sacrum, or by placing an electrode on each of the two sides of the twelfth thoracic vertebra, will elicit perceptible contraction of the prostate gland which the palpating finger will readily distinguish.
 

THE PYLORUS

Constricting Centers

Nerve pressure, concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied between or over the third and fourth thoracic vertebrae will excite contraction of the pylorus.

Center of Dilation

Nerve pressure by the side of, or the paravertebral application of the sinusoidal current to the fifth thoracic will cause the stomach to assume a more vertical position, with the cardia contracted and the pylorus dilated.

Raising the hyoid bone will produce a more marked phenomenon of the same nature than will the nerve pressure or use of the sinusoidal current.

Concussion of the fifth thoracic will also dilate the pylorus and empty the stomach's contents into the duodenum.
 

THE RECTUM

Stimulating Center

The rapid sinusoidal stimulation of the fifth lumbar pair of nerves is one of the most efficient and potent means of increasing the tone and removing pathological conditions of the rectum, except in cases where operative procedure is needed or truly indicated.
 

THE SCALP

Stimulating Center

The circulation and cellular activity of the scalp may be best and most decidedly stimulated by concussion or by the use of the sinusoidal current applied to the first and second cervical segments of the spine.

Vibration of the scalp will produce decided stimulation thereof when applied vigorously and repeatedly from day to day.
 

THE SCROTUM

Constricting Centers

The scrotum may be constricted and contracted and very decidedly so, by the use of the rapid sinusoidal. stimulation or vigorous spinal concussion applied to the tipper three lumbar segments of the spinal column.

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine will cause a general vasoconstriction which will prove an auxiliary measure of treatment when wishing to contract the scrotum.
 

THE SPINAL CORD

Center of Dilation

To dilate the vascular supply to the spinal cords we apply vigorous but intermittent spinal concussion to the eleventh thoracic spine or transverse processes, which will cause a dilation of the blood vessels of the spinal column and this measure is very helpful in the treatment of paralysis.
 

THE SPLANCHNIC ZONES

Constricting Centers

Stimulation of the thoracic segments, or the centers of spinal nerve origin contained therein, from the second to the eighth inclusive, by intermittent concussion, by the use of nerve pressure or by the use of the rapid sinusoidal current, will stimulate the entire area of the splanchnic portion of the abdominal cavity of the body.

Measures to stimulate the vagal nerves will exert a very marked tonic effect upon the abdominal viscera.

Concussion or other stimulation of the upper three lumbar segments of the spinal column will cause decided contraction of the abdominal cavity and the splanchnic zones.

Dilating Centers

Spinal concussion or the sine current applied to the tenth and eleventh thoracic segments will cause dilation of the splanchnic zones.
 

THE SPLEEN

Constricting Centers

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the upper three lumbar segments of the spine will cause constriction of the spleen.  These measures cause fever in cases afflicted at present or during the past, with malaria, because of the contraction of the spleen causing squeezing of the plasmodium of malaria out into the circulation.

Concussion to excite action of the splanchnic nerves will stimulate the action of the spleen and the most marked results will be obtained when the concussion or sinusoidal stimulation is confined to the second, third and fourth thoracic segments or alternated between the third thoracic and the seventh cervical segments, and the upper lumbar segments.

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine, or the transverse processes, will cause constriction of the circulation in the spleen and stimulate the same because of i ts action or influence upon the pneumogastric nerves.

Center for Dilation

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation or the use of nerve pressure to the eleventh thoracic segment will excite dilation of the circulation of the spleen and will also dilate the cellular tissues of this viscus.

For the greatest increase in the activity of the spleen, I would recommend alternate rapid concussion of the second lumbar and the eleventh thoracic vertebrae, or the alternate concussion of the eleventh and the third thoracic vertebrae.
 

THE STOMACH

The stomach is the receptacle of all we impose upon it, and it is expedient that we know how to affect its integrity, and to empty its contents, when so desired.

Constriction Centers

The size of the stomach may be reduced by causing contraction thereof by means of spinal concussion, sinusoidal stimulation or nerve pressure affecting the seventh thoracic, the second thoracic, or the upper three lumbar segments of the spine.

Dilation Centers

Rapid spinal concussion, paravertebral nerve pressure, or sinusoidal stimulation, applied to the eleventh thoracic spinal segment will cause decided dilation of the stomach wall and a descent of this organ in its position.

Irritation of the nasal mucosa by the use of anaestheties or otherwise will cause dilation of the stomach.

Concussion or other stimulation of the third thoracic, especially paravertebral nerve pressure, will cause contraction of the pylorus and dilation of the cardia of the stomach.

Spinal concussion, sinusoidal stimulation or paravertebral nerve pressure affecting the spinal nerve centers of origin situated within the neural arch of the fifth dorsal segment of the spinal column will cause the stomach to assume a more nearly vertical attitude with the pylorus dilated and open and the cardia constricted, which causes an emptying of the contents of the stomach into the duodenum.

This maneuver will cause distress in cases of catarrh, ulceration or any inflammation of the duodenum in a few moments time and is an excellent physical means of diagnosis.

Raising the hyoid bone, which is best done as you stand behind a patient, will excite this phenomenon of emptying the stomach better and more effectually than stimulation of the fifth thoracic spinal segment or the nerve centers of origin contained therein, according to the claims of Dr. H. Jaworski.
 

THE THYROID GLAND

Constricting Centers

The most potent center for constriction of the thyroid gland is the spinal segment contained in the seventh cervical neural arch of the spinal column which may be best excited by rapid but intermittent concussion strokes applied to the seventh cervical spine or to the transverse processes.

Concussion of the middle cervical segments from the third to the fifth inclusive, will stimulate the centers of origin of the cervical nerves which directly ramify and supply the thyroid gland.

The rapid sinusoidal treatment to the second cervical vertebra will affect the thyroid through the vagus nerves, and concussion will also constrict this gland when applied to the fourth and fifth cervical segments because of the impulses transmitted directly to the thyroids by the phrenic nerves.
 

THE TONGUE AND TONSILS

Concussion, rapid and intermittent, of the seventh cervical spine will cause constriction of the vascular system and especially the capillary circulation of the mucous coverings of the tongue and tonsils, and of the tissues of these organs.
 

TEETH AND GUMS

Center to Stimulate

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the second segment of the cervical region of the spine will cause direct stimulation of the nerve supply to the teeth and gums because of the communicating branches of the nerves originating in this segment, which join the trigeminal nerves which supply these organs.

Center to Constrict

The same treatment applied to the seventh cervical spine will constrict the vascular supply to the teeth and gums.
 

THE UTERUS

Center to Constrict

Rapid but intermittent concussion of, or rapid sinusoidal stimulation will cause the most decided contraction of the uterine walls and of the blood vessels thereof.

Rapid sinusoidal stimulation applied to both sides of the spine of the fourth lumbar vertebra will, through the stimulation of the fourth pair of lumbar nerves, where they make their exit from the spine, cause stimulation and contraction of the uterine organ.

Sinusoidal stimulation of the tenth thoracic segment of the spine will cause dilation of the cervix of the uterus and this measure is said to cause childbirth to become almost painless.
 

THE VAGINA

Constricting Centers

Binasal sinusoidal stimulation will excite vasoconstriction of the capillary circulation of the mucosa of the vagina and of the musculature of the vaginal walls.

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the upper three lumbar segments of the spine will cause the most decided contraction of the musculature of the vaginal walls and give tone to, and will assist greatly to overcome conditions of catarrh and leucorrhea.
 

THE VAGUS TONE

Centers to Increase Vagus Tone

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine will stimulate and increase vagus tone and concussion of the upper two cervical segments will also stimulate the vague tone because of a branch from an ansa between the first and second cervical pairs of nerves which join the pneumogastric.

Concussion given to the spines of the second and fourth thoracic vertebrae or nerve pressure to or near the spinal origin of the fourth pair of thoracic nerves will cause greater stimulation of the vagus nerves and their inhibitory control than will the same treatment applied elsewhere.

Dropping the bead back as far as possible and raising the hyoid bone will also greatly increase vagus tone.

The rapid sinusoidal stimulation given to the same centers as is recommended for concussion above will stimulate and increase vagus tone.

Rectal dilation is a very efficient method of exciting and stimulating both vagus and splanchnic tone.
 

VASO-MOTOR TONE

There are subsidiary nerve centers in the spinal cord that control the vaso-motor tone and that cause constriction thereof, and there are other centers which control the dilation thereof and it is an equilibrium between these dilator and constrictor influences that should maintain the normal amount of tonicity.

Constricting Centers

Concussion, sinusoidal stimulation or paravertebral nerve pressure of the seventh cervical segment of the spinal column will cause decided vaso-motor constriction by the excitation of doubtless the chief vaso-motor constricting center in the spinal column.

The same treatment applied to the, upper three segments of the lumbar portion of the spinal column will excite vaso-motor constriction of the vessels of the abdominal and pelvic cavities.

Dilating Centers

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied to the lower four thoracic segments of the spine will cause general vaso-motor dilation which is most marked in the abdominal and pelvic viscera.

The eleventh thoracic segment or center of nerve origin contained therein when stimulated will produce the most specific impulse of dilation of any of the lower thoracic segments.
 

THE VEINS

Constricting Centers

Concussion of the seventh cervical spine will prove the most efficient treatment for venous paralysis and concussion or sinusoidal stimulation applied to the upper three lumbar segments is an efficient auxiliary measure to concussion of the seventh spine in the treatment of venous congestion and varieocele Conditions of the lower extremities and of venous engorgement in the pelvic and abdominal viscera.

Concussion or sinusoidal stimulation of the middle thoracic segments, from the second to the eighth, will stimulate the splanchnic areas but will not constrict as decidedly as stimulation of the upper three lumbar segments.

Dilating Centers

Rapid spinal concussion or sinusoidalization of the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth thoracic segments will cause general relaxation and dilation of the blood vessels and veins.